Reviews

APRIL 2018
on April 17, 2018
This was an amazing book. I read it non-stop from start to finish. This was last year, but I find myself still thinking about it, and that's rare for me, so I figured it was worth my writing this review.
It's a very personal story, but it's also as universal as could be. To me, the book is about how a horrible history, which seems so long-ago, not only permanently warped a young man but continued to cause acute pain to the man's descendants, 60 and 70 years later. Reading about how the author figured everything out was absolutely fascinating. It was also inspiring. This is a story about history, family, being a detective in your own life, and the necessity and challenges of forgiveness.

FEBRUARY 2015     Rabbi Len Zukrow   

 While Karen Kaplan writes very personally of her journey – growing up as the child of a survivor, suffering from her father’s ill will toward her and the terror of a robbery she brings us to forgiveness – the most challenging of human behaviors and emotions. She brings us her story that ultimately becomes our story as we share through her forthright openness her lesson that forgiveness does have the power to overcome tragedy and heartbreak. Her presentation to our community was moving and powerful. A moment of transformation that all of us will long remember as we consider her story when we are called upon to forgive, repent, repair and move forward toward a life of purpose and meaning with kindness and generosity of spirit.

Rabbi Len Zukrow, Temple Beth El of Munster Indiana

July 24, 2016

Lorna Cameron Tough .......I had always believed, Karen, that our bodies carried "our" trauma and I discussed with my therapist last week what you said in your interview and how I wondered whether I carried my father's ptsd. She was in agreement with you. Wake up calls galore for me so I am grateful to you for your validation of your own wounds. Namaste xx

July 11, 2016 The Cornelia Street Cafe with Karen Kaplan and Robin Hirsch

Interesting evening at Cornelia Street Cafe.....What brought my friend Renee and I to the Village was Karen Kaplan discussing her book about growing up in a family of Holocaust survivors & why forgiveness was crucial to "moving on and living a healthy, productive life.....And to the remnants of my extended family, who have risen from the ashes of the Holocaust, I say that I'm a work in progress & am ever hopeful that our current reality evolves.                 -S. Levin 

  • Rook Reviews

    March 15, 2016    Rev. David J. Wood Senior Minister at the Glencoe Union Church   Karen is an outstanding speaker.  She communicates her story clearly and with great compassion.  She doesn’t just talk about forgiveness—she shows us what it means in real life. Her story reminds us of why forgiveness is not just an ideal ...more

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